Shaping a board with Gerry Lopez

Surfing is a young culture and unlike fine art where we can't personally meet Michelangelo anymore there is still an opportunity to look at it's beginning with your own eyes. For every surfer in the world to meet Mr. Lopez in person and see him shaping the surfboard that is famous worldwide is a miracle. It is also a moment to remember, seeing master's work. And an opportunity to learn from a person that has changed surfing culture. He is that one who showed the world surfing in a tube. It's when you ride a board in a water corridor looking at the light at the end of it, hoping to make it out. This feeling is impossible to describe it can only be understood through the personal experience.  

Gerry Lopez is a remarkable surfer and shaper. Possibly the biggest legend of the surfing world.  Matt Wessen met Mr Lopez and watched him shape a classic single fin surfboard from start to finish. Here is the visual story made by Matt and illustrations from Lost&Found collection who's owner Director Doug Walker was kind to provide them for this article.

 Gerry Lopez high line at Pipeline on Oahu's North Shore, Hawaii during the 70s. Picture from   Lost&Found   collection 

Gerry Lopez high line at Pipeline on Oahu's North Shore, Hawaii during the 70s. Picture from Lost&Found collection 

   Gerry Lopez   (left),   John Milius   - Director,   Jan-Michael Vincent   - Actor behind the scenes of   Big Wednesday  . Picture from   Lost&Found   collection.

Gerry Lopez (left), John Milius - Director, Jan-Michael Vincent - Actor behind the scenes of Big Wednesday. Picture from Lost&Found collection.

Fourty years later Gerry Lopez reshapes the classic 7'6 "Pipeliner".

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 The finished product

The finished product

 Picture from   Lost&Found   collection.

Picture from Lost&Found collection.

 Gerry Lopez signing the re-make of a famous board. What a moment captured, master signing his work.

Gerry Lopez signing the re-make of a famous board. What a moment captured, master signing his work.

Photography by Matt Wessen